About this Show

Erin Burnett Out Front

News/Business. Erin Burnett. (2012)

NETWORK
CNN

DURATION
01:00:00

RATING

SCANNED IN
San Francisco, CA, USA

SOURCE
Comcast Cable

TUNER
Virtual Ch. 759 (CNN HD)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
1920

PIXEL HEIGHT
1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 14, Boehner 12, United States 7, Syria 6, Rwanda 5, Erskine Bowles 5, Britain 4, Soledad 4, John Boehner 4, Schwab 4, Bowles 2, Gordon 2, Coburn 2, Susan Rice 2, Trayvon Martin 2, Nyse Euronext 2, United Nations 2, Usaa 2, Clinton 2, Assad 2,
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  CNN    Erin Burnett Out Front    News/Business.  
   Erin Burnett.  (2012)  

    December 3, 2012
    11:00 - 12:00am PST  

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that's the main thing, if she's not eating properly, she needs to get the nutrients she needs. this is one of the best hospitals in the u.k. i have to say there's been a huge media presence here today, more are coming in all the time from all parts of the world. the daily mail, one of the main selling newspapers in this country is dedicating 14 pages to this in the morning. >> the big story just beginning. >> that does it for this edition of 360. thanks for watching, erin burnett out front starts now.
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giving them misinformation. >> at this point, what kind of military action might the united states be considering right now? >> when the president of the united states goes out there and makes a strong statement like he
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did today. >> that's commitment. >> you have to follow up it and do something. >> they're going to watch there carefully. when they see this move, they have to determine rapidly, what are assad's intentions. they're not sure about that right now. get other countries in the region, involved. don't forget, israel lies right over the border. the israelis may not be so patient and wait to see if the chemical weapons are going to be used. >> it's going to make everyone nervous. how deadly is sarin gas? >> 500 times more lethal than cyanide. without an anti-dote and there would be none available to syrian people. it could kill you within minutes. nasty business. >> barbara starr, thanks. appreciate that. troubling developments out of syria come as hillary clinton made repeated the united states position that it will not tolerate the use of chemical weapons. >> we have made our views very clear. this is a red line for the united states. >> so is the united states about to get involved in syria's
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20-month-old conflict? out front tonight, bob baer, peter brooks. nice to have both of you with us. bob, what do you think when does the united states get involved? >> i think the fact they're mixing it is highly alarming, of course. if they start deploying this, if they start putting it on artillery shells, if it looks like they're going to really fire this stuff, you know, i don't see any choice but we're going to have to go in. the west is completely -- what i'd also like to say is, that with the alloites, the regime that runs syria, would they use it? absolutely. if their back is against the wall and they think they're going to go down, they will use any of these binary gases that would stop the revolt, what they would -- they are that desperate.
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i don't know that they're at that point, but if they do, we really have to think about going in. >> you've long been critical of how the administration has been handling this, do you think they should be intervening? >> there's a lot more we could have done. this red line, which i think is a good idea, and also, they could be -- they're certainly signalling to the assad regime. anything before that is okay. we're 20 months into this, it's almost two years, 40,000 people dead, as long as they don't use chemical weapons, it's okay what's going on there. i'm okay what's going on there. if you believe syria's important, i think we should have been more activist. we're not calling for more boots on the ground. i think this is a real problem for us, it's an alliance with iran. it's a possession of chemical weapons. it's human rights record. it's support the terrorism. this is the regime we would like to get out of the way, we don't want to see it replaced with people we don't support either.
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>> i think something should have been done -- >> the president has said that moving the weapons in any kind of threatening way would be that red line. if it's not boots on the ground what is it? >> there are real -- unfortunately, there aren't real good military options. the president has a lot of options short of that that's what i'm wondering. a little bit of strategic ambiguity does serve the administration. something's going to happen to you, we're not saying what that is. it doesn't mean it's military intervention. we're not quite sure. once again, the clarity is important, but at the same dime, the ambiguity that the president laid out there, something bad is going to happen if you do this, may also signal to assad that he shouldn't do what he's thinking about doing. the other question i have out there, soledad is, is the regime thinking about using chemical weapons or did we catch a local commander doing this? and if we want to tell the regime that it's possible that one of your local commanders is going to use chemical weapons, there's a lot of things we still
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don't know, the reporting's been great, there's a lot of things we don't know before this. >> let's say the regime were in fact to fall. there have been many people who have said, this creates a black hole that could have disastrous consequences of its own. i mean, obviously there have been problems figuring out who the rebels are and who to support, they're not a completely coalesce group. what's going on? >> what's going on in libya, the militia's haven't disarmed. we saw what happened with benghazi. al qaeda in iraq is very active there, you're right, we could have a real power vacuum. you have to make a decision, where does this fit on your national interests and what sort of resources and risks are you willing to take to have an effect. >> is the president backed into a corner, if he said, here's the red line, we see everyone marching to the red line, it puts them in a tough position, doesn't did?
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>> yeah, i mean, it's -- >> syria is the center of the middle east. if this thing becomes a failed state with gases like sarin, if al qaeda like groups take it over. it will be a source of instability for the next couple decades, something has to be done now. it's late. but this is -- you can't play around with this any more. >> bob baer and peter brooks, thank you. nice to have you with us this evening. just 29 days and counting from the fiscal cliff, the speaker of the house john boehner offers up his own plan today. and the white house has already offered up their response. a little later, a photo in the trayvon martin case has been released in color. we'll show it to you. a new heir to the british thrown is on its way. it's a baby bonanza.
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our second story out front, a decent proposal after laughing off the president's proposal last week to avoid the fiscal cliff, john boehner today put out his own terms for a deal. which he says adds up to $2.2 trillion in savings. boehner's deal includes $800 billion in savings from tax reform from closing special interest loopholes and deductions. $600 billion in so-called health savings, which includes changes to medicare. 300 billion other mandatory savings. 300 billion in further discretionary savings. the white house swiftly shot it down. until the republicans in congress are willing to get
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serious about asking the wealthiest to pay slightly higher tax rates, we won't be able to achieve a significant balanced approach. >> a man who's been called one of the keys to reaching a real deal. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >> let's begin with this letter that comes -- is addressed to the president and comes from the majority leader, boehner. in this letter, he sort of lays out part of his plan. what do you think of his plan as we've laid out so far, and in the specifics this letter. >> i think the first thing i've heard you say, the white house is reacting negatively to it, which is really concerning to me. that -- what he offered was what erskine bowles offered to the select committee as a compromise between the democrats and the republicans. i'm certain if this is not good enough for the white house, we will go over the fiscal cliff. >> this is a compromise on taxes.
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this is a compromise on mandatory spending. and it's a compromise on discretionary spending over what the select committee had debated. >> i should mention that erskine bowles has put out a statement himself. while i'm flattered the speaker would call something the bowles plan. the outline in the letter the speaker sent to the president does not represent the bowles simpson plan, nor is it the bowles plan in my testimony on deficit reduction. i simply took the mid point of the public offers, put forward during the negotiations to demonstrate where i thought a deal could be reached at the time. he's very much backing away from speaker boehner's letter. the question i wanted to ask you is some of the details, as you know, it's all in. >> can we spin one more point on that? >> absolutely. >> here's speaker boehner who is taking a mid point on the compromise between the two sides
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and offered it, and it's already flatley rejected? >> i think he may be rejected, sir, if i may -- >> i'm not talking about simpson -- erskine boelsz. i'm talking about the white house's response to it. >> let's get to that too. i think what erskine bowles is saying in his statement, that this letter from speaker boehner does not represent his theory, number one, but i think the line that the white house is having problems with, and i believe i found it in page two of the speaker's letter, i'll read it to you if i can. he says this, notably, the new revenue in the bowles plan, what he's calling the bowles plan would not be achieved through higher taxes, which we continue to oppose and will not agree to, in order to protect small businesses and our economy. instead, new revenue would be generated through progrowth tax reform that closes special interest loopholes and deduksz while lowering rates. i'm going to guess that is the very line that the white house
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is going to say no deal to, right? >> so let me understand. if, in fact, we want $800 billion in new revenues, and we can do that through closing loopholes, limiting deductions for the wealthy in this country, and we're going to not have a deal because it's not a rate increase, but rather taking the same amount of money from the same people and we're going to say no to that? >> well, there are people who said, the math doesn't work out. closing the loopholes doesn't get you enough money. >> soledad, i've been studying this for seven years. that's bologna. there's -- it's easy to get $800 billion out of the wealthy in this country by limiting deductions and taking away options that are specifically benefiting only the well off in this country. >> case, but -- >> all you have to do is -- for example, people making more than
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$250,000 a year, should we give them a mortgage deduction on their vacation home? should we? in other words, they won't even consider any of that because it offends too many constituencies. >> you had said, sir. and i'll review your own words if i may. you said, i'm all for the wealthy paying more taxes. so i'm curious, since you've said that, why the reduck tans to just raise the tax rate on the wealthy? >> it destroys growth of the very people who are going to create additional revenues in the future. >> why say you would be all for it? >> i didn't ever say -- not one timedy say i was for raising tax rates on the wealthy. i said i was for increasing the taxes that the wealthy paid. how you do it will have a major impact on the economic fortunes of this country. and if you take the vast majority of small businessmen who will be hit with an increased tax rate, you're going
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to markedly decrease the job creation and capital formation in this country. >> let me ask you another question, one of the things we talked about on both sides, i think it's fair to say is the lack of details. and second geithner was out trying to defend some of the details in his plan over the weekend. this letter also has very few details. i'm curious to know exactly what loopholes, what deductions would you kill? i think for a lot of people who worry about the child care credit or the mortgage deduction would like to know specifically what's on the line. and at what rate. >> i put out a report called subsidies for the rich and famous, about a year ago, that listed $30 billion a year that we could take from the wealthy, on things they get a significant advantage from. so it's not that we can't do it. what i -- all this jockeying in public, we need real leadership right now. there shouldn't be anything offered in public. what it should be is the president and speaker boehner in a room, and nobody come out of the room until this is solved.
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the long term -- we're paying gotcha politics and that has nothing to do with the long term best interest of this country. and what we ought to be is, i'm okay to compromise even on some of my issues, if in fact we'll solve the problem, what we have is a game being played for political -- for the extreme right wing and the extreme left wing in this country, rather than coming together and leading and solving the problem. >> thank you, sir, we appreciate your time. >> good to see you, soledad. our third story out front tonight, ambassador rice's role in rwanda. a group of religious leaders have opened a new line of attack on the woman believed to be the leading candidate for secretary of state. by questioning rice's role in the clinton administration during the rwanda again side. rick warren tweeted this. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side
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and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government,
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ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground littered with hundreds of thousands of bodies is what made her passionate about the issue of preventing again side in the future. she realized this was a wrong decision of the administration. she spoke about that experience. and there's also a quote from her in this book reference, in
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which she swore if she ever faced a crisis for that again, she would argue for dramatic action and go down in flames. >> so then why -- why religious leaders, especially these two speaking out against her,
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explain that? >> well, for instance, i spoke with rabbi schmooley earlier this morning, he said this is the guiding principle of religious faith, that any of these people are god's children. in 2011, $110,000 in marriott stock and $1,300 for every meeting they attend. we have somewhat new photo of george zimmerman, the man charged with the shooting death of 17-year-old trayvon martin. this photo was taken after the shooting while he was sitting in a police car. you can see his face bloodied, nose swollen. we showed you this several months ago, but back then, it was a black and white copy. the family wants to see the x-rays of his nose.
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which he claims trayvon martin broke the night of the shooting. the head of u.s. africa command says al qaeda is al qaeda's best financed affiliate. they're one of the major groups that have taken over northern mali. today, general hamm says they have a lot of money, a lot of weapons. that's why international leaders have been working on a plan for military intervention in the region. here's what general hamm had to say about that. >> if there is to be military intervention, it has to be successful. it cannot be done prematurely. if there was an undertaking of a military endeavor today, from a tactical assessment, it would be
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unsuccessful and set back the conditions even further than they are today. >> he also said that negotiations are the best way to deal with the rebels. flu season is off to an early start. officials say this is the earliest regular flu season they've seen in nearly a decade. they also note they're seeing a higher r r than normal number of flu reports in the south. the cdc director dr. thomas frieden is encouraging people to get vaccinated. saying this year's flu vaccine is a match with the strain that has been circulate l and it's been 487 days since the u.s. lost its top credit rating. what are we doing to get it back? got some good news from automakers. november was the best month for u.s. auto sales since january 2008. our fourth story, showdown. house speaker john boehner today gave president obama a taste of his own medicine, putting out his own proposal for avoiding
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the fiscal cliff. i spoke with tom coburn this hour and he said the deal boehner's put on the table is the best compromise out there. listen. >> i'm certain that if this is not good enough for the white house, we will go over the fiscal cliff. >> if you read though, the boehner proposal carefully, no tax rate increases, which we know is a nonstarter for the president. so where does that leave us? john avlon is here to help us read through the lines of the deal, also crunch some of those numbers. first, we're talking about the $800 billion figure. that's in the letter that john boehner wrote to the president. break that down for us. >> that's right. there is no numbers breaking that down. it's a where's the beef question. bumper sticker, we have the
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numbers but no details. boehner's aides will say that's where the negotiations come in. the devil's in the details. they'll say look, to achieve these revenue increases by closing deductions and loopholes. in the letter boehner sent, he says they may be able to lower some rates based on comments
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made by erskine bowles. >> i think for folks especially we're left to wonder. some analysis shows it's possible. >> i think for folks especially the middle class, they're trying to figure out the math. those deductions and loopholes, do they actually dig into the middle class? >> that's right. and what the romney campaign tried to do with a similar style proposal. and in fact the democratic group third way said if they got a $35,000 cap and excluded charitable deductions, they might be able to reach that $800 billion target. that is however not lowering rates. keeping them where they are today. so some folks have crunched these numbers, but it's tough to reach that and as you said, this is not dealing with the white house saying we want to raise those rates. >> they say nonstarter. which means it's really not meeting in the middle. look at the other parts of this proposal. $600 billion in health saving, which would include changes to
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medicare. not specifically laid out. 300 billion and other mandatory savings. 300 billion in further discretionary savings. what exactly are we talking about there? >> we have these bumper sticker top lines, when aids are pressed they say, we can increase the medicare eligibility age which the white house has backed from 65 to 67. perhaps means testing in some of those mandatory cuts. maybe form subsidies, but this is where the give and take will occur. boehner and obama have met before. the summer of 2011. they put a lot of specifics on paper. when boehner coudn g backing from his conference. >> how close is this toth i didn't see this in advance. this was reallyop b. th tn goatn.3 > dl nde. s >> there has been progress. >> right now i would say we're nowhere.3 irey ssisc. paul begala, david frum, former adviser to president george w. bush. gentlemen, nice to have you both. david, let's start with you. depending on who you listen to, it's either going great or not going well at all. they're either optimistic or completely pessimistic. which is it? >> i feel about this whole process as a basketball nonfan, i feel about basketball, which is start it 100-100 and play for five minutes to get it over with. but i think we also need to take a step back and realize just how lunatic this whole process is. what the united states does not need right now is either
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spending cuts or tax increases. what we should be thinking about is how to get growth. instead of the mishandling of the deal in 2011, we have to pretend that we have what is the most urgent thing to do right
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now is to balance the budget, do it immediately and come up with a ten-year plan in less than a
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month under the most unfavorable conditions possible using the income tax system which is the last place where we should be looking for revenues. we should be looking for revenues from different kinds of taxes. for taxes on consumption and carbon emissions. the whole thing is crazy. what we really as to be demanding is is let us out of this mess. do not cooperate with the fiscal cliff idea. rebel and say just extend everything and come back later when the economy is at full employment. >> how do you rebel against the fiscal cliff idea? paul, if you listen to boehner and his plan, he sort of says
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it's erskine bowles plan. is it possible to rebel against an idea marching along? we're on day 29, heading into day 28. >> i get excited when i hear david say things so far outside the box. but this is washington. i guess it's not air box, it's a beltway here. and we are in this debt mania. there is a long term crisis on debt. i think david would agree with that. if you actually go back and read what my old boss and his partner wrote almost two years ago now, they said these things, these cuts in tax increases should be back loaded so we don't damage the economy. in the president's proposal, he does have a small infrastructure bank program to try to jump-start some growth, so i think it's a good idea. raising tax rates on the rich. i saw your interview with senator coburn. he is committed to debt reduction. he has really put in the time here and i admired his work on this. but even a guy like senator coburn who was on the commission and supported its report can't state the obvious. we need to go back to the clinton era rates for the most well off americans. it's not going to kill us. the line between freedom and tyranny is not the 35 we pay now and the 39 that the rich will pay as we did when america was a communist paradise. it's just silly now. you've got to be for a tax rate increase or we will go over this fiscal cliff. >> no, you don't. you could raise from a carbon tax of $20 a ton, which will deal with, we are having the biggest record carbon levels. you could raise -- at 4% a year over the next ten year, twice as much as you could from allowing the bush tax rates to lapse. why the income tax system is overburdened in the united states. we use it too much. we should be looking at other taxes. we can't do it in 29 days. why are we doing it in 29 days? >> but the president ran on
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>> the republicans must agree to higher tax rates on well off americans. all the way to the 39.6 that the president, they have to. that's the ticket for admission because the president won the election and campaigned on that. the democrats are going to have to agree. they'll use euphemisms, but agree to cutting medicare and medicaid. and by the way, that means cutting for seniors and poor people and special needs kids. that is not an easy thing to ask anybody to do, let alone the democratic party. which really created these programs. this is going to be awful and gruesome, but 70 for 60 in your poll, 60% of americans want to raise taxes on well off americans. 70% don't want to cut or 80, don't want to cut medicare or medicaid, so the hard stuff is coming. this is the easy stuff. we can't even get the republicans to agree to that. >> we're out of time guys, nice to talk to you as always. i appreciate it. next, violent clashes along the turkey, syria border and a new heir to the british throne is on the way. our piers morgan will explain
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we're back with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to our sources around the world. as russia's president made a rare appearance in turkey today, to meet with the country's prime minister. they pulled nonessential staff from the area. clashes continue along the
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border of those two countries. ivan watson is is in istanbul and i asked him how close the latest syrian air strikes were to the turkish border. >> the air strikes hit within site of the turkish border, sending panicked civilians fleeing to the nearby turkish border, also sending warplanes in the air in response to these close air strikes. all of this happening just hours before one of the biggest traditional supporters. vladimir putin sat down for talks with the turkish prime minister who's been one of the biggest enemies. both leaders trying to down play their difference, play up their huge trade, but they disagree on turkey's request to deploy patriot missile batteries along the border. eat enough food, making her strong enough to get through this early stage of the pregnancy. she'll be worried the information is out already, because it is very early on in the process. >> so then what do you think the implications are economically speaking? one has to imagine a little baby royal is going to bring even more interest all on the royal family. >> well, i'm always amazed about the story that is the british royals because it's a truly global story and it's a great
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picture of kate that it will make magazines pretty much in every country in the world a truly global story, so certainly this is going to be a huge boom for the media industry. you'll see a lot of merchandising, you saw soledad over the royal wedding, all this huge amount of merchandising. i know you were over here for that. it's really for britain, a branding story, the royal wedding was one of the biggest media events in history. it did huge favors for the tourism industry. buckingham palace remains the most popular tourist destination in london.
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this plays into that story. they were the most popular royals ever. this is the next part in their story. they had the wedding, and then the baby. some concerns. it all plays into a narrative here. it's a big u.k. branding story. >> only you could spin it as a u.k. branding story. there have been tweets about the next heir to the thrown. they have been coming in from all over the world. some of them from piers morgan himself. hearing rumors that william and kate are considering the name piers for their child. you must be so proud? >> i'm as surprised as you are. soledad. having been the one that started the rumor, i'm not exactly holding my breath here. >> one can imagine. >> why do you think everyone around the globe is so interested in the story of the royals? i mean, it never really ends.
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i think a lot of people are rooting for this couple. they like this healthy, normal, if you can be marriage. >> the biggest stars in the world. and they really are, i mean, i think the wedding cemented will & kate as the two biggest figures of any type in the whole of the planet earth. i mean, they replaced really princess diana in that respect. with that comes enormous media
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scrutiny. i think the american public loves them. you have a president who can only last eight years and they get replaced. in britain, the one constant in my life, in my 47 years, like so many others in britain has been the royal family. prime ministers come and go, and politicians and footballers and cricketers and whatever you want. the family that is always there, the bedrock of our society is the royal family. i think william and kate have given this whole new energy and dynamism along with harry and fergie's girls and so on. they are an enormous brands, really, in their own right. they bring in billions of pounds every year, to the british economy. and on the global stage, they just stand for something that's very british. they're very well educated, well spoken, they're charming. they are great public servants, they do great work, which they call public duty for charity and so on. they stamp a quintessential old fashioned british values. >> what does it mean for this baby in the royal hierarchy. does this mean that prince harry will never ever ever be king? and this baby could be king or dween one day? >> the rule has always been in the history of the royal family, that the first born son, the first boy would be the heir to the thrown. if an heir had a son, that would be the future king. but now it's being changed and parliamentarians in britain have been pushing through a law that would make it legal for -- if the first born of wills and kate
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is a girl for her to automatically become queen. the complication is, that law hasn't gone through yet. and it has to go through before
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she is born, if she's a girl. i'm guessing william and kate probably know the sex of the baby.
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uding the fact th preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen.
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tomorrow on the show, two of the men at the center of the fiscal cliff negotiations, tom cole of oklahoma and the man behind the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist will both be "outfront." the new film called zero dark 30 based often the raid that killed osama bin ladin and some charge the obama administration gave the producers certain access. thanks for joining us. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news.
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military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad!
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